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In-Box Review
135
German Railroad Track
European Gauge Track
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by: Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]


Originally published on:
RailRoad Modeling

introduction
Project Armor35 trains our attention upon German Railroad Track for military modelers. ARM35012 is a 12.0m straight section of European gauge track (1435mm - 4 ft 8 1⁄2 inch) of rail type S49. The model is 342mm (13.5 inches) in length and assembled with resin and wood parts.

This length of standard gauge track is part of Project Armor35, an endeavor from Russia to create accurate 1/35 German and Soviet railway subjects of the Great Patriotic War era.

Railroad modeling is being fortified with an ever expanding selection of models in the dominate military scale of 1/35. Armor35 produces track and rail spikes in resin, trackside equipment such as signs and water standpipes, wooden and resin sleepers (crossties), scale sand and stone ballast, coal, and figures.

While there is not currently a 'model rail scale' for 1/35, it is very close to No. 1 Scale (1/32), also referred to as Gauge 1, Gauge One, 3/8". Regardless, it does afford some crossover to electric model railroading.

Currently Armor35 offers 51 1/35 models and accessories. Resin, and wood and other natural materials are used to create these authentic products.

in the box
This is a particularly interesting model to me. Movies like The Train and Von Ryan's Express, and others are favorites of mine, and include scenes of sabotaging track by unscrewing the bolts that clamped down European rails; bolt clamps and nuts are not how track is built in America and the concept fascinated me. Soviet track which Armor35 also offers is built more like the American prototype, rail being secured to cross ties with iron spikes.

The kit is packed in a one-piece cardboard box with a tab-locking hinged lid. A color photograph of the assembled model superimposed over a faint WWII sepia tone scene.

Inside are 141 gray resin pieces, 19 wooden cross ties ("sleepers"), two assembly jigs:
    Track assembly jig - 1 pc.
    Sleepers (cross ties) assembly jig – 1 pc.
    Rails, type S49 – 2 pcs.
    German sleepers (250х25х15) – 19 pcs.
    Standard plates – 38 pcs.
    Double plates – 2 pcs.
    Fishplates – 4 pcs.
    Rail clamps with bolts – 76 pcs.

Armor35 track sections are joinable to create longer sections and to mate their track buffers / bumpers.

Parts. All of the resin parts are crisply molded without any air bubbles or other flaws. Most of the small pieces are attached to pour blocks, although Armor35 thoughtfully separated the rails from their blocks. However, parting the three dozen tie plates from the sheet they share may be tedious, especially if they are too thick and must be sanded down. Two of the four fishplates are slightly bowed.

A hard fine grain wood is used for the cross ties. Each one is sharply cut. No splinters nor fuzz nor saw striations mar the ties.

Jigs. The track assembly jig is actually more than just a spacer. It can also be used as part of the sub-base for the track roadbed, effectively "lowering" the ties nearer to the top crust of ballast. The cross ties (sleepers) assembly jig is important, as it helps align the wooden ties for the tie plates and clamps.

detail
Each rail is cast with open bolt holes at each end. The bolt and clamp details are crisply defined. Detail is well defined on all pieces.

Instructions
Model manufacturers will tell you that instruction sheets can be difficult to create and add cost. Armor35 must take a great deal of pride in their model as their instruction sheet is professionally illustrated and printed. A full size track schematic assists the modeler through assembly. Sub-assemblies are also illustrated, as is the use of the sleepers assembly jig. They include measurements to guide you in spacing the rails for the desired gauge.

No painting guidance is provided other than the color photo "box art". This should not be a problem as there is a plethora of color images or track painting information available online and off. Modelers might not know the “AI” method of coloring the ties: “AI” is well-known in the model railroad community as a mixture of alcohol & india ink that you soak the wooden components in.

Conclusion
Modelers in need of a length of German railway track should be happy for this kit - it is an impressive length of model track. The casting is high-quality, sharp and crisp, without air bubbles. Detail is great.

I greatly appreciate the wooden ties. And especially the assembly jigs.

If I could suggest two things it would be a brief discussion of rail and sleeper coloring, and perhaps a basic outline of roadbed profile for those who want to put this track on a diorama.

This track is very good and I happily recommend it.

Please tell vendors and retailers that you saw this kit here - on RailRoadModeling.
SUMMARY
Highs: The castings are high-quality, sharp and crisp, without air bubbles, and with great detail. Assembly jigs are provided.
Lows: Tie plates are cast in bunches on a sheet.
Verdict: This is an impressive kit that should be popular with modelers incorporating German railway tracks.
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: 35012
  Suggested Retail: 1350 руб
  Related Link: Railway sleeper Germany
  PUBLISHED: Aug 25, 2014
  NATIONALITY: Germany
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.00%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 93.83%

Our Thanks to Armor 35!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Frederick Boucher (JPTRR)
FROM: TENNESSEE, UNITED STATES

I'm a professional pilot with a degree in art. My first model was an AMT semi dump truck. Then Monogram's Lunar Lander right after the lunar landing. Next, Revell's 1/32 Bf-109G...cried havoc and released the dogs of modeling! My interests--if built before 1900, or after 1955, then I proba...

Copyright ©2017 text by Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of ModelGeek. All rights reserved.


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