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Book Review
Dornier Do 24 Units
Dornier Do 24 Units Combat Aircraft 110
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by: Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]


Originally published on:
AeroScale

Introduction
Dornier Do 24 Units by Osprey Publishing LTD presents the history of the elegant Do 24 flying boat. It is the 110th title in the series Combat Aircraft. Modelers who have the Italeri/Testors 1/72 Do 24 model should find this book highly desirable.

Dornier produced some of the Luftwaffe’s most graceful aircraft during WWII and the Do 24 was certainly one of them. While the Do 24 was heavily used by Germany, it also saw intensive war service with Holland over the Pacific against Imperial Japan. Ironically, while considered an excellent flying boat by all who operated it, the Luftwaffe originally rejected the swan-like Do 24 in favor of the troubled, ungainly Blohm & Voss BV 138, “The Flying Cog". Dornier was only allowed to continue to build it because Holland had placed a large order for the flying boat!

Built in both Holland and occupied France, Do 24s soldiered on under several flags both during and after the war: Australia; France; Holland; Russia; Spain. One French-built example survives today, powered by turboprops. This variety of camouflage and insignias should inspire modelers, offering ideas for modelers who want the sleek Dornier yet perhaps tired of Luftwaffe colors.
    Perhaps the most seaworthy flying boat ever built, the elegant, tri-motor Dornier Do 24 served with both the Allied and Axis forces in very different parts of the globe during World War 2, garnering an excellent reputation along the way This study uses archival records, first-hand accounts and revealing photographs to illuminate the combat career of this remarkable aircraft for the first time in English. The German-built Do 24 was the Netherlands Navy's principal aerial asset during the Japanese invasion of the East Indies. While the survivors of that ordeal served in the Australian Air force, in occupied Holland and France production continued apace and the Do 24 equipped the German Air-Sea rescue service, whose crews loved and respected the machine. The type witnessed the rise and fall of the Luftwaffe over all the European seas, took part in the desperate evacuations of Wehrmacht troops on the Baltic in the face of the overwhelming Soviet advance, and was pressed out of service only with the withdrawal of Spanish Do 24s in 1969. This volume tells the long and eventful story of the faithful Do 24 in full. - Osprey


The book
Dornier Do 24 Units is authored by Peter de Jong and illustrated by Chris Davey. It fills 96 pages with a concise text supported by photos and 30 original color aircraft profiles. Its ISBN is 9781472805706. It is available in softcover, ePUB and PDF, those having different ISBNs.

Content
Dornier Do 24 Units is presented through seven chapters, an appendices, bibliography, index, and color plate commentary:
1. AIRLIFT INTO NARVIK
2. GENESIS
3. X-BOATS
4. ATLANTIC COAST RESCUE
5. MEDITERRANEAN AND BLACK SEA OPERATIONS
6. BALTIC THEATER AND SPECIAL OPERATIONS
7. OTHER OPERATORS

I find the book to be well written, interesting, and easily read. There is a good balance between specific details and the overall story of the Do 24.

The story begins during the German Norwegian campaign of 1940, when the Royal Navy vanquished the German Navy and bottled up German troops in Narvik. An ersatz airlift was hastily organized and while the Luftwaffe’s darling BV 138s were bobbing around their moorings with technical difficulties, a prototype Do 24 quickly volunteered to ferry supplies over enemy controlled seas with no navigation charts. Twice the Do 24 had to land to ask directions of the locals, and it picked up some holes from RN flak. Yet the Do 24 made several round trips and proved that Dornier had more to offer than bombers. This captivating account opens the book, immediately followed with the design and building of the aircraft. Next, the design and production of the Do 24 is then chronicled through Genesis. Seventeen pages later is the story of X-Boats, as the Do 24 was known in the military of Holland. The Netherlands East Indies knew that Japan would start a war soon and needed modern flying boats to scout their vast Pacific territories. Their roles in scouting, supplying, evacuating and even offensive combat operations are described in concise detail.

Atlantic Coast Rescue presents the role the Do 24 played for Nazi Germany and Germany’s organization of the Do 24 for SAR. Twenty-four pages recount the Do 24’s role in the Mediterranean, Baltic, Black Sea, and special operations missions.

Finally, nine pages detail the Dornier's role with other countries. The remaining pages contain an appendices, bibliography, index, and color plate commentary.

Photographs, artwork, graphics
A fine gallery of black-and-white photographs and a rare color photo supports the text. Most are of good quality. There are some showing damage to airframes. Some show personal markings unusual for the Luftwaffe.

Artist Chris Davey contributes 30 original full-color profiles of Do 24s. The variety of camouflage and insignia should inspire modelers, offering ideas for modelers who want the sleek Dornier yet perhaps tired of Luftwaffe colors.

Conclusion
Do 24 Units is a good book that fills a void in the saga of WW2 flying boats. It is well written, easy to read, and interesting. If you seek a subject full of dropping bombs and shooting guns, this the Do 24 did not do much of that. The selection of photographs should please modelers, historians and artists. The gallery of color profiles are certain to please fans of this flying boat.

Modelers who have the Italeri/Testors 1/72 Do 24 model should find this book highly desirable.

There isn’t anything major the criticize the book about. Therefore, I happily recommend the book to modelers, artists, and historians of the Do 24, and those interested in flying boats, the Dutch defense against Imperial Japan, and air-sea operations.

Please remember to mention to vendors and retailers that you saw this book reviewed here – on Aeroscale.
SUMMARY
Highs: This is a good book that fills a void in the saga of WW2 flying boats. It is well written, easy to read, and interesting.
Lows: Nothing worth mentioning.
Verdict: Modelers who have the Italeri/Testors 1/72 Do 24 model should find this book desirable. It is a necessary book for modelers, artists, and historians of flying boats, the Dutch defense against Imperial Japan, and air-sea operations.
  Scale: N/A
  Mfg. ID: 9781472805706
  Suggested Retail: $22.95
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Dec 19, 2015
  NATIONALITY: Germany
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 86.98%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 90.20%

Our Thanks to Osprey Publishing!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Frederick Boucher (JPTRR)
FROM: TENNESSEE, UNITED STATES

I'm a professional pilot with a degree in art. My first model was an AMT semi dump truck. Then Monogram's Lunar Lander right after the lunar landing. Next, Revell's 1/32 Bf-109G...cried havoc and released the dogs of modeling! My interests--if built before 1900, or after 1955, then I proba...

Copyright ©2017 text by Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of ModelGeek. All rights reserved.


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Comments

There is at least another survivor in the "Museo del Aire" de Cuatro Vientos, Madrid, Spain. Radial engines and SAR scheme.
DEC 19, 2015 - 09:06 PM
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