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In-Box Review
172
ARL-44
ARL-44
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by: Andras [ SPONGYA ]


Originally published on:
Armorama

Introduction

The ARL-44 was a peculiar tank. Design started immediately after Paris was liberated (hence the ď44Ē in the name -signifying the date), and was more of an effort to re-establish Franceís heavy industry, tank production, and to retain its talent, than actually an attempt at designing a modern tank.

The design called for a 48 ton heavy tank with a high calibre armament. Due to the wartime shortages, and the consequences of German occupation, the design had to incorporate several compromises. Its design is based on the pre-war French tanks, but it also bears some resemblance to the later German tank designs (it does look like a child of a Tiger II and a B1). The power plant was chosen to be captured German Maybach engines (HL230 600 hp), and the first prototype turret was armed with an American 76mm gun, which was later replaced by a new turret, and a 90mm DC45 tank gun. The turret was well armoured and large; an actual car engine was used to rotate it.

Not only the overall design was anachronistic; the suspension, drive wheels and the tracks were quite old-fashioned as well. The armour was well sloped at 120mm. By 1945 the need for a heavy tank disappeared, but the French authorities decided to press ahead with the production of 60 vehicles (downsized from the original 600). This was a political -and an economical- decision, rather than a military one as it was mentioned previously. This showed an incredible amount of foresight on behalf of the decision makers in my opinion.

The production trials started in 1947, and delivery started in 1949. The tanks were used to replace the captured Panthers the 503e Rťgiment de Chars de Combat regiment operated. (Which is also an interesting story by itself.)

In service the ARL-44 was found to be less than satisfactory. The suspension, gearbox and other parts of the running gear had frequent breakdowns, which resulted in the tank being recalled from active service in 1953, and replaced by the M47 Patton tanks.

Review

Cromwell Models sent the model in a simple ziplock bag; no artwork, and no instructions included. The parts were undamaged during transit.

The model is cast in a yellowish resin. The casting generally is good, although some issues are visible (around one of the drive wheels, and there was a bubble in the muzzle break). This is not surprising, considering how intricate the parts are; the level of detail moulded on is pretty impressive.

Some of the resin parts are incredibly fine; the gun lock in particular is a wonder by itself. Itís moulded onto some resin support; despite my worst fears it was very easy to cut it free without snapping it.

The hull is essentially one piece: everything is moulded on: tracks, running gear, everything. Itís attached to the moulding block through the tracks; youíll need a large, fine saw to cut it free. (And youíll need to be careful, not to cut into the tracks. A word about sawing resin: resin dust is toxic. Use wet sawing, wet sanding techniques when working with resin to minimize harm to yourself and others around you.)

The lack of instructions is not really an issue for this model; the number of parts are so low, itís really not that difficult to figure out what goes where. (Although I still cannot figure out where that cross-like part is goingÖ)

The gun barrel is very nicely done; itís straight (not always the case with resin models), and the bubble on the underside of the muzzle break was easy to fill in. The only minor issue I had was the top of the turret: the surface is marred by tiny little holes, which I completely missed at the priming phase. (I normally use black primer). They should be easy to fill in, if you catch them BEFORE you paint the tank. Well, lesson learned; itís grey primer from now on.

Since I play World of Tanks, Iíve decided to paint my model using the non-historic bluish-greenish color the French tanks come with; Iíve used some left-over decals from a French M5 Stuart to dress it up a bit. (The printing on the decals is awful, but they do give a little color to the tank.) I was seriously tempted to use the branch/leaf camo pattern from World of Tanks, though, but since I was doing a review I decided to forgo the silliness. If I get another French tank that is in the game, Iíll do the pattern, though. (Batchat, here I come.) Iíve used different oil paints for filters and for the washes, and different dust/earth/rust colored pigments for the dirt accumulated on the vehicleís lower parts, which were fixed with odourless turpentine. Iíve rubbed the edges with a graphite pencil to give the model a little metallic shine as a last touch. Later on Iíll probably add some mud splashes, but for now I just let the paint and pigments cure a bit.
SUMMARY
Highs: easy to assemble (great ďgateway tankĒ to resin modelsĒ), rare subject.
Lows: some moulding issues.
Verdict: In conclusion, itís a good model. It has all the usual issues of resin models, but that is to be expected. Itís simple to assemble, itís accurate, and you have a quite unusual subject available.
Percentage Rating
85%
  Scale: 1:72
  Suggested Retail: 25
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Apr 28, 2016
  NATIONALITY: France
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 84.98%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 85.20%

About Andras (spongya)
FROM: BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

I am a biologist by trade, and as a hobby I've been building scale models for the last twenty years. Recently I started to write reviews of the models I bought. These reviews are written from the point of view of an average model builder; hence the focus is on quality of the model, how easy it is to...

Copyright ©2019 text by Andras [ SPONGYA ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of ModelGeek. All rights reserved.



Comments

the first french tank after ww2. but this is 1/72nd and in resin.
APR 28, 2016 - 02:07 AM
Yes, it is all of those things.
APR 28, 2016 - 03:14 PM
   

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