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Built Review
148
Carrier Deck Display Base
WWII USN Wooden Deck Display Base
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by: Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]


Originally published on:
AeroScale

WWII USN Wooden Deck Display Base
Item: SW-48015
Scale 1/48


Introduction
Skunkmodels Workshop has brought the modeling world another carrier deck display base. Unlike other such bases, this one is modular and can be expanded to an unlimited size. It features real wood deck segments and photo-etch tie-down grates.

WWII USN Wooden Deck Display Base
Skunkmodels Workshop packs their display base in a light weight end-opening box decorated with a photograph of the assembled deck and a model. Inside the box are three sealed bags holding the base quarters, the anchors and fascias, decking segments are tie-downs, and instruction sheet. Strangely, the back of the box is the same box back as the modern carrier kit -- even the text!

The wood deck sections have nice woodgrain and have laser scribed planks. Each is nine planks wide between tie-down grates. My research shows that USS Yorktown class decks were seven planks wide while Essex carrier decks had 11 planks between tie-downs.

Between the plank sections are the tie-downs. These are built up of wood strips with laser cut ovals overlapped with photo-etched anchor grates. I sprayed the tie-down components with an enamel. The wood did not warp.

While this kit is titled WWII USN Wooden Deck..., Essex class carriers (and other classes) with wooden decks served through the Korean War, and beyond.

Assembly
The decking sets upon square semi-flexible plastic base quarters. Four of these are secured together by slotted fasteners at the center, at each corner, and each center junction of every two squares. A slotted support also pinches the edged of each square to the adjoining pieces. These parts hold the four squares together and add support to the base. Along the edges are fascia strips. These are slightly higher the top of the base to secure the decking while providing a slight lip to keep models from sliding right off if tilted.

I placed the first deck plank section, then butted a tie-down strip against it, then added the next plank section, added another tie-down strip, and so on. The pieces need to be slightly bowed to fit. Once under the fascia lip the parts lie flat.

The basic set creates a square base almost 9.5 inches square. This is large enough for most carrier aircraft through the Korean War, though an Avenger, SB2C, and definitely the Skyraider and Tigercat would look out of place.

Colors
SMW does not provide painting guidance. Pre-war US Navy carrier decks were teak, and teak is a reddish brown color. I've seen the color referred to as a mahogany stain. Chrome yellow markings were used.

Archives show that as early as July 1941 the Navy was applying blue stain to some carrier decks. Prior to November 1941 the flight deck of USS Ranger was stained a sea blue, Blue Deck Stain, Norfolk Formula No. L-81-3m. After sea trials the stain was reformulated and became Norfolk No. 250N Blue Flight Deck Stain. Markings were a light gray.

During the war other colors were tried, such as a variant of 5-O Ocean Gray known as #21 Flight Deck Stain. In mid-1944 returned a dark blue color, #21 Flight Deck Stain (Revised). This color was used through the Korean War.

To show off the nice woodgrain I chose not to stain the deck -- yet.

Conclusion
I am thoroughly impressed with this model. Mainly because of the wood planking. Also for the modular construction. You can theoretically expand the deck until Skunkmodel runs out of kits!

The display base is easy to assemble and looks very good. I would appreciate some guidance on deck color options. It is big enough to accept most USN carrier planes through WWII. Highly recommended!

Please remember to tell vendors and manufacturers that you saw this model here -- on Aeroscale!

REFRENCE

Adoption of Blue Flight Deck Stain on US Navy carriers. http://www.shipcamouflage.com/specialtopics/BlueFlightDecks.html. Michael J. Vorrasi.
30 April 2005.
SUMMARY
Highs: Wooden decking with photo-etched tie-down grates.
Lows: Fascia does not fit smoothly.
Verdict: An excellent way to display a WW2 US carrier plane model.
Percentage Rating
95%
  Scale: 1:48
  Mfg. ID: SW-48015
  Suggested Retail: $19.95
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Sep 06, 2011
  NATIONALITY: United States
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.00%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 83.44%

Our Thanks to Skunk Models Workshop!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Frederick Boucher (JPTRR)
FROM: TENNESSEE, UNITED STATES

I'm a professional pilot with a degree in art. My first model was an AMT semi dump truck. Then Monogram's Lunar Lander right after the lunar landing. Next, Revell's 1/32 Bf-109G...cried havoc and released the dogs of modeling! My interests--if built before 1900, or after 1955, then I proba...

Copyright 2017 text by Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of ModelGeek. All rights reserved.


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Comments

It looks great, a real time saver for sure! I will definately be in the market for this product. I have a Tamiya 1/48 F4U-1D just itching for a place to call home :-). Thank you very much for the review and heads up. Take care. Jim
SEP 06, 2011 - 10:46 PM
Hi Fred Thanks for the great review. It looks a really neat idea. I'll certainly get one if I spot it at the LHS. All the best Rowan
SEP 09, 2011 - 11:24 AM
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