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Built Review
135
Unteroffizier with MP40
German Soldier of WWII
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by: Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]


Originally published on:
Armorama

German Soldier of WWII
Mfg. ID: ARM35107

Armor 35
has added another Wehrmacht subject to their growing series of 1/35 figures: ARM35107 German Soldier of WWII. As this subject is an Unteroffizier with an MP40 Maschinenpistole, I refer to the model as Unteroffizier with MP40.

This figure, with ARM35110 Guard Dogs, creates another set: ARM35106 German soldier with a dog of WWII.

Unteroffizier with MP40
This model is sculpted in a pose that imparts, to me, an alert soldier on patrol.

This model is packaged in the standard top flap-opening box that Armor 35 uses for their figures. Box art is the painted model superimposed over a sepia tone of a scene from the Soviet Union. Inside the box the model is packed in several small zip-locked baggies holding the parts.

Inside are nine gray resin parts on pour-blocks:
    1. Body without arms
    2. M35 Stahlhelm helmet
    3. Right arm cradling an MP40
    4. Two different left arms
    5. M31 Feldflasche Canteen; Tragebusche fluted steel gasmask container; MP40 magazine pouch
    6. Bayonet for the K98 bayonet

This Sandlatschen ("sand traipser", like "Dogface" for American and "Tommy" for British soldiers) is sculpted by Anishchenko Dmitriy. The hefty body appears a bit pudgy. It is sharply detailed with deep folds on the Feldbluse (Field Tunic) Model 1936 uniform, a 'bread bag,' and leather belt. He is not wearing his Y-strap equipment harness.

Casting is crisp. There is no flash nor seams or bubble pocks. What I first thought was excess resin from sloppy casting is actually attachment areas for the gear. Armor35 does a thoughtful job of sculpting their figures so that the gear impresses into the underlying clothing, unlike many plastic figures upon which modelers are forced to unrealistically stick a part onto.

Detail
Feldbluse detail includes Litzen on the collars and the shoulder straps have waffenfarbe piping. The Wehrmachtsadler eagle is clearly seen. Plenty of buttons and cloth seams are sculpted, plus the belt buckle has good detail.

This Stoppelhopser ("Stubble hopper") has a well-sculpted face that looks stern and alert. Why two left arms? Armor35 also uses this figure in set ARM35106, German soldier with a dog of WWII. One hand is relaxed while one grips something (a leash).

Detail of the MP40 is good but the barrel arrived broken off.

The canteen, gasmask container and magazine pouch are exceptional.

The helmet has a hefty pour stem that could complicate removal from the sprues. Careful - I broke mine!

assembly and painting instructions
None. Assembly should be easy although you must seek references for painting.

conclusion
This is a classically posed figure. A soldier traveling by foot, not in battle yet alert.

Sculpting and casting are very good and detail is impressive. This was a very enjoyable model to paint. Recommended!

Please tell vendors and retailers that you saw this model here - on Armorama.
SUMMARY
Highs: Sculpting and casting are very good and detail is impressive. Most pieces of equipment are separate and a choice of arms allows some assembly choice.
Lows: The barrel of the MP40 arrived broken off of the Maschinenpistole.
Verdict: This figure can be integrated into almost any scene.
Percentage Rating
92%
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: ARM35107
  Related Link: German soldier with a dog of WWII
  PUBLISHED: Jan 26, 2014
  NATIONALITY: Germany
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.00%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 93.83%

Our Thanks to Armor 35!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Frederick Boucher (JPTRR)
FROM: TENNESSEE, UNITED STATES

I'm a professional pilot with a degree in art. My first model was an AMT semi dump truck. Then Monogram's Lunar Lander right after the lunar landing. Next, Revell's 1/32 Bf-109G...cried havoc and released the dogs of modeling! My interests--if built before 1900, or after 1955, then I proba...

Copyright 2017 text by Frederick Boucher [ JPTRR ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of ModelGeek. All rights reserved.


Reader Reviews
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Comments

Strange little fellow! First of all, the subject is "highly special"! Never seen anything like it! Second (and I start at the top) the chin strap is much too massive! The tunic collar is not too convincing either. The ominous seam at the cuffs looks odd. The left hand is not too natural. The bottom half of the tunic is way too voluminous. The ammo pouch could be better in detail. And finally, the legs are totally out of proportion (thighs are huge!!). The MP40 may be right in proportions, but it looks very thin to me. All in all, I can't understand the motivation to produce (or buy) such a figure, when there are better "brothers" around en masse! The fact that the painting on the box cover is monotonous (and thus wrong) does not help either! Cheers Romain
JAN 27, 2014 - 09:14 AM
I completed the painting.
JUL 15, 2014 - 10:24 PM
Well done on the review Fred! I like this one!! Decent pose...I could make this fit into a small dio nicely!! Great job on the painting too btw!!
JUL 15, 2014 - 10:44 PM
I don't know...some Dragon figs look better!
JUL 16, 2014 - 10:29 AM
Fully agree to that, but at least Fred's painting is great!! Well done Fred!!! Cheers Romain
JUL 16, 2014 - 04:04 PM
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