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RailRoad Modeling

Cliffs Rock! Layout Scenes III

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Cliffs Rock! This third installment of Layout Scenes deals with not a specific locale. Rather it provides modelers examples of the infinite variety of banks, cliffs and rock formations near and dear to model railroader hearts.
Ups and Downs of Elevations
Not the least of which is the visual effect of a hill to break up a constrained and compressed model layout scene. Mountains are also popular because it is easier to mix up and apply plaster to raised scenic framing to model bare mountains and hills than to model majestic forests with lots of trees, or even grasslands.

While there are several well loved flatland model railroads out there, soaring elevations - or at least rocky hillocks - are immensely popular on railroad layouts. So the color and form of the strata is contingent on what part of the country one models. From the limestone outcroppings of Kentucky through the granite of the Rockies, across Arizona's pink sandstones, to Californian quartz, the diversity of geological locales are possibly infinite.

The photographs examples I offer here are a razor-thin slice of geologic pie. Appalachia and the mid-South, and the stark rugged beauty of Arizona. This demonstrates that the modeler should not feel constrained with 'cookie-cutter' strata and uniform color. I purposely ignored common uniform formations.

Another characteristic I want to display is that rocks don't have to be 'rock color.' You can see that whether in the dampness of the Smokey Mountains or the arid rock of the Superstition Mountains, moss and lichen can paint the stone with surprising color.

I hope that these photographs inspire modelers to color and sculpt outside the scenic box! Model rocks and cliffs that are available can be accessed at lower left: RELATED LINKS.
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About Frederick Boucher (JPTRR)
FROM: TENNESSEE, UNITED STATES

I'm a professional pilot with a degree in art. My first model was an AMT semi dump truck. Then Monogram's Lunar Lander right after the lunar landing. Next, Revell's 1/32 Bf-109G...cried havoc and released the dogs of modeling! My interests--if built before 1900, or after 1955, then I proba...